DES in the News

All the news about DES that’s fit to print!

Dark Energy Survey publicly releases first three years of data

At a special session held during the American Astronomical Society meeting in Washington, D.C., scientists on the Dark Energy Survey (DES) announced today the public release of their first three years of data. This first major release of data from the Survey includes information on about 400 million astronomical objects, including distant galaxies billions of light-years away as well as stars in our own galaxy.

DES scientists are using this data to learn more about dark energy, the mysterious force believed to be accelerating the expansion of the universe, and presented some of their preliminary cosmological findings in the special session. As part of that session, DES scientists also announced today the discovery of 11 new stellar streams, remnants of smaller galaxies torn apart and devoured by our Milky Way.

The public release of the first three years of DES data fulfills a commitment scientists on the survey made to share their findings with the astronomy community and the public. The data cover the full DES footprint – about 5,000 square degrees, or one eighth of the entire sky — and include roughly 40,000 exposures taken with the Dark Energy Camera. The images correspond to hundreds of terabytes of data and are being released along with catalogs of hundreds of millions of galaxies and stars.

University of Sussex physicists help discover new stellar streams

Scientists from the University of Sussex, headed up by Professor of Astrophysics, Kathy Romer, are part of a team of 100 physicists from around the world who journeyed to Chile to study ‘dark energy’.

This week, Professor Romer and her colleagues have released the first three years’ of data from the Dark Energy Survey, announced at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Washington, DC on Wednesday 10 January. This first major release of data from the survey includes information on around 400 million astronomical objects, including distant galaxies billions of light years away as well as stars in our own galaxy.

Chilean children name newly discovered Milky Way streams

The Dark Energy Survey discovered nearly a dozen new stellar streams in three years of DES data. Stellar streams are the remains of dwarf galaxies and star clusters that have been ripped apart by the gravitational force of the Milky Way. These streams provide important information about the formation history of the Milky Way and can be used to trace the local distribution of dark matter. The unprecedented sensitivity and coverage of three-year DES data set has allowed us to search for fainter and more distant streams than ever before. Read the full paper (and all paper associated with this press release) here.

Dark Energy Survey publicly releases first three years of data

The public release of the first three years of DES data fulfills a commitment scientists on the survey made to share their findings with the astronomy community and the public. The data cover the full DES footprint – about 5,000 square degrees, or one eighth of the entire sky – and include roughly 40,000 exposures taken with the Dark Energy Camera. The images correspond to hundreds of terabytes of data and are being released along with catalogs of hundreds of millions of galaxies and stars.

Rivers in the sky

Most of the time, the Dark Energy Camera in Chile stares out into the deepest regions of space, measuring light from distant galaxies. But this gigantic eye sometimes discovers things closer to home—like the 11 newly found stellar streams that the Dark Energy Survey announced today. For a few lucky groups in Chile and Australia, this meant an extraordinary opportunity: getting to name an object in space.

“The people were very enthusiastic,” says Kyler Kuehn, a scientist with the Dark Energy Survey who coordinated the outreach effort in Australia. “I don’t know if they are aware how rarely people get to name things that are newly discovered in space—or anywhere, for that matter—but I was pretty excited about it.”

A night in the deep beyond – Brian Schmidt hosts three international astrophysicists, discussing dark energy, unseen planets, and gravitational waves

7PM-8:30PM TUESDAY 7TH NOVEMBER, 2017
THE UNIVERSITY OF QUEENSLAND, ST LUCIA, STEELE BUILDING (3), THEATRE 206

You’re invited to a night of astrophysics adventure! Join Brian Schmidt, Nobel Prize winner, as he presents three exciting international astrophysicists from the Dark Energy Survey, Professor Risa Wechsler, Professor David Gerdes and Professor Marcelle Soares-Santos. Learn about gravitational waves and black holes, hear about whether there’s a ninth planet in our solar system far beyond Pluto, and learn how to simulate the entire universe in your (rather high end) computer.

Scientists spot explosive counterpart of LIGO/Virgo’s latest gravitational waves

Scientists using the Dark Energy Camera have captured images of the aftermath of a neutron star collision, the source of LIGO/Virgo’s most recent gravitational wave detection.

Before and after images of Galaxy NGC 4993, showing the appearance of the kilonova event.
The LIGO-VIRGO Collaboration (LVC) issued a trigger known as G298048 (later renamed to GW170817, according to the actual date of the event). A team of scientists using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), the primary observing tool of the Dark Energy Survey, was among the first to observe the fiery aftermath of a recently detected burst of gravitational waves, recording images of the first confirmed explosion from two colliding neutron stars ever seen by astronomers.

An event that blew away the astronomical world

On the morning of Thursday, August 17, 2017 the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration (LVC) gravitational wave detectors picked up a signal indicating a binary neutron star (BNS) collision. For the astronomers privy to the news of this detection, it was just the beginning of a momentous day.

Why was this day special? While LVC had detected four gravitational wave events already, they were all binary black hole (BBH) coalescence events. The discovery of gravitational waves was undoubtedly one of the biggest finds in the history of physics, but if there was any downside to those events, it was that BBH mergers were not expected to give off any electromagnetic radiation from radio, to visible light, to high energy gamma rays. Many astronomers pointed their telescopes towards these events just in case, including those of the Dark Energy Survey, but no light was seen. While this matched predictions, astronomers and physicists were left waiting for an even more exciting event, a gravitational wave detection from an event that could also be seen in the electromagnetic spectrum. The most likely candidate for such an event was a binary neutron star (BNS) collision.

Gravitational waves tell us how fast the Universe is expanding

On August 17th 2017, three detectors on Earth observed a gravitational wave (GW) event known as GW170817. Scientists localised the origin of the event to a 30 square degree patch of the sky by observing the GW signal in the three locations (two LIGO detectors in the United States, and the recently commissioned VIRGO detector in Italy). For reference, that is sixty times the size of the full moon. Although that might sound large, in the emerging field of GW astronomy, 30 square degrees is an approximately tenfold improvement on what was possible before a third detector came online. Independently, the space based Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detected a gamma ray burst (GRB170817) less than two seconds after the GW event.

Scientists spot explosive counterpart of LIGO/Virgo’s latest gravitational waves

Scientists using the Dark Energy Camera have captured images of the aftermath of a neutron star collision, the source of LIGO/Virgo’s most recent gravitational wave detection.

A team of scientists using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), the primary observing tool of the Dark Energy Survey, was among the first to observe the fiery aftermath of a recently detected burst of gravitational waves, recording images of the first confirmed explosion from two colliding neutron stars ever seen by astronomers.

Scientists on the Dark Energy Survey joined forces with a team of astronomers based at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) for this effort, working with observatories around the world to bolster the original data from DECam. Images taken with DECam captured the flaring-up and fading over time of a kilonova — an explosion similar to a supernova, but on a smaller scale — that occurs when collapsed stars (called neutron stars) crash into each other, creating heavy radioactive elements.